Fishing

Sunglasses are essential fishing gear. Everybody agrees that a rod, lures, and a hat ought to be in every angler’s kit, but sunglasses? It’s true. I’m a fisherman, too. Most important, the right sunglasses give protection from flying hooks, debris, streamside branches and rod tips, eye injuries that are surprisingly common among anglers. Durable polycarbonate fishing glasses reduce that risk and leave us free to think about fishing. Make it a rule when you fish-- nobody gets in the boat without glasses or a personal floatation device. On land, nobody picks up a rod without picking up their sunglasses first. After all, we all start with only two eyes. Keeping them both healthy should be a priority, whether in recreation or at work. The right sunglasses help you see better too, important for spotting tailing fish in the saltwater flats or cruising trout in a freestone river. Polarized lenses eliminate the glare off the water’s surface, and make a big difference in seeing your surroundings on the water. As a good fisher knows, getting to the spot where the fish are improves the chance of catching them. If you can actually see where the fish are holding and where they are feeding, you’re going to have better luck.


Let me tell you a story to illustrate the point. Last season, I took care of a man who had been catching stripers in the Delta. He wasn’t wearing glasses. Tussling with a fish on deck, he felt something go in his right eye, which was irritated the rest of the day. The next morning, he came to see me. His eye was red and painful and his vision was blurry from a large corneal ulcer. His eye was scratched, probably by a fish scale, which led to a serious bacterial ulcer. He recovered his vision after a few weeks of vigorous antibiotic therapy. He’s learned to wear sunglasses when he fishes.


In my training, I’ve taken hooks from the eye and face, too. Usually from a buddy’s back cast or after a unsuccessful try at setting the hook, the consequences of a sharp hook or a heavy lure in the face can be devastating. Durable polycarbonate fishing glasses reduce that risk and leave us free to think about fishing. Make it a rule when you fish-- nobody gets in the boat without glasses or a personal floatation device. On land, nobody picks up a rod without picking up their sunglasses first. After all, we all start with only two eyes. Keeping them both healthy should be a priority, whether in recreation or at work.


Tight lines!